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for support for artistic people that looked nothing like me. this is a civil rights issue. we all have to be included. host: we are talking about the federal response to the rise in optimism with ari ne'eman, the president and co-founder of the artistic self advocacy network -- autistic self advocacy network. our next call comes from florida. go ahead, please. are you there? go right ahead, please. caller: i need to know -- what do you do with a 20-year-old and a 22-year-old that was diagnosed -- has been on medication ever since they were about five years old, and they go from doctor to doctor, and when they take their medication, they look bleary eyed, and we have tried every kind of medication, but they cannot communicate, and the school that they were in -- have been in -- they have been in a group where some of the kids were so bad until they could not -- you cannot learn where there is so much confusion. you can sit down one-on-one with them, and they can pick up some things, and they can easily remember telephone numbers and things that are exciting -- they can remember that, bu
in cocoa, florida, for harriette and harry moore, leaders of the civil rights movement in florida. harry moore established the first branch of the naacp in brow ward county, florida, and considered the first martyr of the 1950's era civil rights movement. sadly on christmas night in 1951, the moores were killed by a bomb planted beneath their home. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in strong support of this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the chair recognizes mr. clay from missouri. mr. clay: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i, too, want to join with my colleague from arizona in consideration of h.r. 2338 to name the post office in cocoa, florida, after harry t. and harriette moore. in accordance with committee requirements, h.r. 2338 is co-sponsored by all members of the florida delegation and was reported out of the oversight committee by unanimous consent. it honors the legacy of harry t. and harry moore who both fought tirelessly for civil righ
station back on new year aday in 2009. at 9:00, two civil rights lawyers will argue before the 9th sir coit court of appeals that b.a.r.t. police should not get legal immin tu from this lawsuit filed bay the -- ill munty from this lawsuit filed by the the -- immunity from this lawsuit filed by the family of oscar grant. >>> coming up at 7:47, how the kansas city chiefs and their community responded to the jovan belcher tragedy. >>> four people including three firefighters are still in the hospital this morning after a serious accident in other rin da. it happened on -- orinda. it happened on eastbound 24 near wilder road. it all started when an suv crashed into the center divide. while one of the drivers and three firefighters were standing on the right shoulder, another suv lost control pushing another car into them. they were all rushed to the hospital with major injuries. >>> the weekend storm brought major problems to the south bay and that had actuallity workers and law enforcement working overtime. a man, woman and child were were stuck in their car after flooding on east capita
people and that's a high-tech in equality and that's why i've called it a civil rights issue. those people make choices, but it will have them an affect on individual child or kids would be better educated, and i think you'll have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say school choice. [applause] >> i would only add standards. it's important we as a society said very clear expectations, for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- as a member of the cabinet, secretary of state for education in the united kingdom where i got educated. so i look inward -- i look forward to hearing your questions. >> thank you very much. i just want to say, it's been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach on united. [laughter] >> the ultimate compliment. >> to hear you speak. >> the first time i've ever worried about -- [laughter] >> but you made the point that you're changing things and they also matter -- [inaudible] one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that it recognize this is a moral conflict much than anything else. and america realized tha
the country? and all the fingers kept pointing back to alec. >> when civil rights and grassroots groups learned about alec's connection to stand-your-ground laws, they were outraged. >> alec doesn't do its work alone. they do it with some of the biggest corporate brands in america. >> before long, corporations were pulling out of alec, including coca-cola, kraft foods, mcdonald's, mars, proctor & gamble, johnson & johnson. caught in the glare of the national spotlight, alec tried to change the subject. >> you know, i think the entire debate needs to be reframed. and really what alec is, is a bipartisan association of state legislators. we have legislators of all political stripes coming together to talk about the most critical issues facing the states and trying to come up with the best solutions to face some of the problems that we're having. >> all right, so your point is it's not a partisan organization. >> but alec is partisan, and then some. >> in the spring i got a call from a person who said that all of the alec bills were available and was i interested in looking at them. and i
civil rights and they said that the senate was ending revenge for gettysburg and the rules of the senate have lent themselves -- back then, it blocked civil rights but it wasn't a work a day kind of obstructionist. as horrible as it was blocking civil rights legislation. today is it is almost everything. you need 60 votes. it doesn't even -- the majority leader can't even bring a bill up to debate without a 60 votes if the minority wants to force 60 votes. that's got to change. the selection -- the confirmation of federal judges and less than cabinet level appointees, those kinds of things are just obstructionism, period. when in the past, we always were able to just bring it forward to get 51 votes. if you don't, you don't. some of these votes will be more aimed to that. certainly to give the minority rights to slow things down but not to block things. almost haphazardly the way they do. >> bill: otherwise it is the tyranny of the minority. >> it really has become that way. so much of what the preside
intensely about it, where will put everything on the line to make it happen. in the civil rights era, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibuster's done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights in a deflation were opposed by republicans, just as they were by non- southern democrats. the fact is that civil rights and legislation and overcoming this filibuster's and being enacted which at least as much to the credit and responsibility of everett dirksen, the minority leader, as to lyndon johnson. what we have seen is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool, and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party has fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues where the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near it unanimously. keep in mind on nominations, where holds w
know, howard baker was everett dirkson's son-in-law. and during the run up to the civil rights bill, howard is sitting up in dirkson's office, phone rings, dirkson picks it up, says -- and all howard can say is him saying, mr. president, i just can't come down tonight, i was there last night. i was there the night before, i just got to go home. hangs up. 20 minutes passed, and he hears beagles barking in the hallway outside his office. and lbj walks in with his dogs. so because he wouldn't come down to see him, johnson called a car, got in and came up to just force a conversation with dirkson. >> and lyndon johnson -- >> and we got a bill. >> and by the way, l lyndon johnson. he's so detached and disconnected from the hill, he would call, mark haleprin, famously, subcommittee chairman in the house. and say, hey, i hear the mark-up didn't go very well today. do you need any help? what can i do? do you need me to call anybody? how can i push this along? again, we're not heaping all the blame on the president. let me underline again. >> yeah. >> john boehner's counter offer was patheti
historic laws including the civil rights act of 1964. what a life. jack brooks, dead at 89. bill: 25 minutes past the hour. there could soon be a major shortage of primary care doctors. the journal of the medical american association says 22% of internal medicine residents are planning to become internal medicine doctors. what does this mean to you? marc siegl joins us now with the latest on this. doctor, nice to see you. >> good to see you. bill: what does it mean. >> i want to explain to our views out there exactly what an internal medicine doctor is. we always talk about primary care. primary care is a pediatrician, obstetrician, gynecologist for women's health, family practitioner or a general internist, which is what i am. someone who does the internal organs of the pwaopbd say body and says i'm not going to become a lung specialist, i'm going to stay as a general doctor. you're sick, you're having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, i'm the guy you see. people need doctors like that. without doctors like that what are we going to do? there was another study two years ago, th
that many church-goers have changed their views about gay civil rights is one of the most underreported reasons why same-sex marriage is now legal in nine states. it is also one of the reasons that the constitution of prop 8 which took away gay californians right to marry. may get a hearing. the announcement was to be today. probably friday. a majority of main line protestants and roman catholics now favor legalizing same-sex marriage. did you know that? i knew a majority of americans. i did not know a majority of protestants and catholics favor marriage equality. >> that's awesome. >> stephanie: i was quite interested. >> thank you. >> stephanie: so when other more conservative christian kin claim it is against the bible we beg to differ. they wrote this in the "l.a. times," we posted this up on steph stephanie miller facebook. there are only three passages that deal with homosexuality in the new testament. the passages don't deal with homosexuality but with temple prostitution and other abuses. i'm
with more on her legal moves. >> that's right. staff sergeant jennifer hunt is suing the department of defense, as the civil affairs specialist in the army affairs. hunt has deployed to iraq and afghanistan, even earned a purple heart. hunt says the policy bang women from direct ground missions is illegal. the department of defense says more than 14,000 jobs previously closed. two women have opened up to them this year. denise? >> all right. thank you, kai. hunt says this lawsuit isn't calling for a certain number of combat positions to be open to women. but instead to give women an equal opportunity to compete for the jobs. >>> in wjz's healthwatch, a new study could change the standard of care in breast cancer treatment. new research suggests women should take tamoxifen for 10 years. twice as long as the current five-year recommendation. researchers at the university of oxford found breast cancer patients who took the drug longer, were less likely to die, and less likely to have their cancer come back. >>> well, a former student at frostbur
to pay for the clean-up. right? >> that's right. they set aside a $20 billion fund voluntarily to compensate victims. there is also going to be additional penalties as part of civil violations of the clean water act, estimated to be 21 billion. >> that's probably going to be handed down in the next few months. this is just to settle criminal charges for the company pled guilty to 14 criminal guilty pleas, 11 counts 50 seaman's manslaughter, a criminal violation of the clean water act, a migratory bird act and for obstruction of justice, for submitting false information to the congressional investigation during the summer of 2010. >> the 20 billion clean-up fund the 21mul billion. >> for the clean water. >> billion? 41? so this criminal fine was? >> four and a half 689. >> >>. >> so $50,000,000,000. >> the company said aside all of that money. they had been selling off assets and they've got a huge cash reserve and the 20 billion for clean up that's in the fund. >> they can absorb this and stay in business? >> absolutely. >> that's been their plan.
, that the magnitsky act remain focused scairl and exclusively on russia. that's what russian democrats and civil society groups tell me they want right now. they want congress to send their government a message on human rights and by keeping the magnitsky act focused for now on russia we can do just that. furthermore, the administration can use its own executive authority at this time to apply similar kinds of pressures contained in the magnitsky act to human rights abusers in other countries. i for one will be watching closely to see if they do. for in many other cases are crying out for greater u.s. leadership on behalf of human rights. and if the administration does not take the initiative to apply the leverage at our disposal to these other cases beyond russia, that is the surest way to ensure that the congress will act to globalize the enact next year. there are still many people who look at the magnitsky act as anti--russia. i disagree. i believe it's pro-russia. believe it's pro-russia because this legislation is about the rule of law, and human rights, and accountability which are values
conservatives will likely rebel. more "bill press" up after the break. we will be right back. exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. at cepacol we've heard people are going to extremes to relieve their sore throats. oh, okay, you don't need to do that. but i don't want any more of the usual lozenges and i want new cooling relief! ugh. how do you feel? now i'm cold. hmm. this is a better choice. new cepacol sensations cools instantly, and has an active ingredient that stays with you long after the lozenge is gone. ahhh. not just a sensation sensational relief. did you get chips for the party? nope. cheese plate? che
syndrome. 45 minutes after the hour. right back on "the stephanie miller show." >> oh, my! how ruthlessly absurd! >> announcer: it's "the stephanie miller show." exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall let's rock and roll. there is so much going on that every day presents another exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. get irresistibly clean and fresh carpets in your home with resolve deep clean powder. the moist powder removes three times more dirt than vacuuming alone while neutralizing odors for a clean you can see, smell and really enj
promote high standards of journalism and protect both the public interest and the rights and liberties of individuals. is it should set and enforce standards. hear individual complaints against its members, and provide a fair, quick, and inexpensive arbitration service to deal with civil law claims. the chair and the other members of the body must be dependent and appointed by a fair and open process. it must comprise a majority of members who are independent of the press. it should not include any serving editor or politician. that can be readily achieved by an appointments panel which could itself include a current editor, but with a substantial majority, demonstrably independent of the press, and of politicians. in the report, i explain who might be involved. although i make some recommendations in this area, it is absolutely not my role to think to establish a new press standards code or decide how an independent self-regulatory body would go about its business. as to a standards code, i recommend the development of an industry economy which could include serving editors. that comm
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)